Why do I need Systemic Enzymes?

There is a natural substance in the blood called fibrinogen. If there is trauma or injury to a blood vessel the fibrinogen is converted to fibrin. Fibrin is a sticky protein that adheres to the walls of the blood vessel. As blood cells and platelets arrive they begin to stick to the fibrin to form a blood clot and stop the bleeding.

Enzymes are universally used throughout the body and life cannot exist without them. A systemic enzyme is an enzyme that supports your circulatory system. If they are in your digestive system they are called digestive enzymes, if they are in your blood stream, they’re called systemic enzymes. There is a natural substance in the blood called fibrinogen. If there is trauma or injury to a blood vessel the fibrinogen is converted to fibrin. Fibrin is a sticky protein that adheres to the walls of the blood vessel. As blood cells and platelets arrive they begin to stick to the fibrin to form a blood clot and stop the bleeding. Unfortunately, blood may also clot when platelets adhere to fibrin on fatty plaque of atherosclerosis, and create an unnecessary blood clot over time. When tissues are starved of proper blood flow they will begin to weaken and die. Fibrinolysis is the process of dissolving blood clots. Fibrinolysis is achieved by an enzyme called plasmin. As our bodies age, production of enzymes begins to decline. An unhealthy production level of these enzymes can lead to the development of blood clots, and the health imbalances caused by them. Other factors such as bacteria, viruses, and toxins in the blood can cause inflammation resulting in cross-linked fibrin that can circulate in the blood and stick to the walls of blood vessels. Narrowing blood vessels and increased blood viscosity (thickness) contribute to increased blood pressure and other health imbalances.

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